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Room 2B HIVE

Citizens pollinating our future with civic understanding.

Unit 5 - POLITICAL PARTICIPATION

5.1

Voting Behavior

5.2

Voting Turnout

5.3

Political Parties

5.4

Party Changes

5.5

Third-Parties

5.6

Interest Groups

5.7

Groups Influence

5.10

Social Movements

 

5

POLITICAL

PARTICIPATION

POLITICAL

Participation

ASSESSMENTS

5

5.8

Electing a President

5.9

Congress Elections

5.11

Campaign Finance

5.12

The Media

5.13

Changing Media

In My Shoes:

Role Playing American Government and Politics

 

Oprah said it succinctly, “Leadership is about empathy.  It is about having the ability to relate to and connect with people for the purpose of inspiring and empowering their lives.”  This is not new.  Women’s Rights advocate, suffragette and poet Mary T. Lathrap wrote in 1895:

 

Just walk a mile in his moccasins
Before you abuse, criticize and accuse.
If just for one hour, you could find a way
To see through his eyes, instead of your own muse.

 

In each of our five (5) units of study in American Government and Politics you will be invited to connect with relevant players.  To better understand government and politics, walk in the shoes of those who have and continue to shape our government and politics.  The end result will not only improve our understanding; provide practice of essential skills; but also inspire and empower our own civic engagement.  Welcome. Get ready to “take the time to walk a mile in [their] moccasins.”

'Toon In

1. What is the funny?

2. Has the U.S. Supreme

    Court become a policy-

    making institution?

    Explain.

3. "To the victor, goes the

    spoils." Should that apply

    to our judicial system?

'Toon In

1. What is the funny?

2. How does the Electoral

    College work? Is it

    working?

3. Make an argument 

    for/against big money in

    politics.

In The News

When Elections Are Transformative

by David Oshinksy

 

The narrative seems set in stone.  Every four years, regardless of who is running for president or what shape the country is in, Americans face the most consequential election of their lives. It's the ultimate political cliche, and it's been around for centuries.  In 1868, the Atlantic described the race featuring Republican Ulysses S. Grant and Democrat Horatio Seymour as "the most important election that Americans have ever know."

...

The Electoral College Today

by A.S. Belenky

 

The Electoral College created by the Founding Fathers and today's are two different election mechanisms.  The Founding Fathers might have expected that the Electoral College would only select the candidates for both the Presidency and the Vice Presidency, and Congress would choose both executives from among the selected candidates.  In any case, the equality of the states in electing both executives in Congress was expected to compensate for the inequality of the states in the Electoral College.

The Twelfth Amendment has substantially changed the initial design ...

 

Listen to the podcast above and complete the following exercise.

"Nothing gives one person so much advantage over another as to remain always cool under all circumstances." T. Jefferson

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